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Rugged

Ruff Adventure

Chris [Entry 2]

First off thank you for everything that you guys do for the off-road industry! It happened to be my 3rd trip out in my prerunner, finally after 2 years of endless hours spent in the garage! It was New Years weekend out in Gordon's wells.. I was finally able to enjoy some simple seat time when all of a sudden my rear tire flew off my truck and ended up in the canal, not only was I alone but I was miles from my camp! This is when I realized I had no way to reach out to my family to come help save me!! Luckily people like you guys in this industry are so awesome an willing to help! Ended up taking me 3 hours to get back to camp with my truck! Here's a little video someone was using to film kids riding an caught it all on film for me!

Michel [Entry 15]

On my way to get to the top of the mountain, my front wheel sleep to the left so I need to back up to get my Jeep in line.

I only forgot the details that just behind my left rear wheel, there was a 2 feet drop...oups, I sleep over on the top.

See the picture for the final result and look at the big drop in front of my jeep. Thanks to the small threes to hold me there.

The challenge was to get the Jeep back on his wheels in the middle of the mountain.

Friends winched me back on my 4 wheels. A costly experience...

Josh [Entry 28]

Went on my first UTV ride in the mountains of WV only to become separated from the main group on multiple occasions. The first of which was the very first ride and it was at night no less. Before we left it was made very clear you were to keep an eye on the guy behind you and stop if you lost visual so as to create a chain event to the front of the pack. In doing so the last few of us were separated as the person in front of myself did not stop. Thankfully we had a local in the back to show us the way. However, it happened another time later that night. This time the local that was separated with us knew how to get back to camp so to speak but was not familiar with where the main group was heading. We searched for their tracks up and down the mountain side for some time before finally sitting in one place and hearing the machine of the group leader going up and down the mountains looking for us. It took some time but he did manage to collect us and return us to the group. Definitely an eye opening experience for my first time in mountainous terrain. Through the course of the weekend it happened a couple more times but I wasn't in the separated group every time. We even managed to have the group get divided and lost from one another with the front and rear persons having a small means of communication. It was an adventure and still had a good time but it could have been more enjoyable had we not spent as much time stopped/looking for separated/lost vehicles. I think having a few vehicles with communications throughout the group would have been best and hopefully next time that will be the case as I do plan to partake in more adventures.

Jason [Entry 32]

Less than 12 hours after I bought the jeep I took it out to test out 4wd and lockers. Ended up driving across what seemed a dried up river bed, got halfway across and felt the jeep drop 2 feet into what seems like black tar/quicksand and reeked of rotten feces. Tried using a shovel to did my way out but as soon as I moved to the next tire the other hole I did filled back up. I broke 2 winch cables, and a few tow straps in the process of winching myself out. Tried using my cb radio to contact anyone nearby since I had limited cell service and ended up having to walk miles back to the highway and flagging someone down to catch a ride back into town. The next day brought out a few more jeeps and a 1 ton cummins dually and ended up breaking a bubba rope, and destroyed my rear bumper from all the yanks but 48 hours later I was out. If I had a rugged radio I could of reached out further to get some assistance getting off the trail.

Dennis [Entry 35]

A group of us went up to Elbe, WA. to the OHV park and I lead the group. No one said anything about the mud holes being so deep. They swallowed my 39.5 Boggers and flooded the cab of my S10. I had my daughter aka Princess in the cab in both of these. She was pissed..not really but could of used a good radio to talk to the group in front of us.. A "heads up" would of been good. All in all it was a really fun day with friends on the trail.

Matt [Entry 51]

I was working a week long remote medical job as a paramedic outside Kanab, Utah. I figured between a cell phone and CB I was set. WRONG! One of the first mornings of the event, I was on a trail headed to a remote check point with a few other event staff when I snapped an upper control arm on my Duramax, causing my drivers side 35 to roll under the vehicle, wreck the tie rods and grenade my diff in the process. Way outside of town, no cell service, nothing on CB, no radio, no way any tow truck would dare get me. I knew I was on a trail that was being used for the event so I started taking everything apart and waited for someone to come by. 5 hours later, a coworker with a radio stumbled upon me when we had yet to show at the checkpoint. We were able to call down to another person at the local NAPA on it, order all the parts and tools I needed to get it off the trail and con the poor kid behind the counter to drive the parts and tools out to me with his UTV when he got off work. Unfortunately, the show had to go on so my coworker loaded up the rest of the staff and headed out. I wrenched well into the night alone and not only did it drive off the trail(2wd of course) but I was actually able to finish the event and drive it the 6 hours home. Needless to say, if I was smart and had communication, I probably wouldn't have spent the night out there alone. How can you be mad with that view of the Grand Canyon though?am several times and kept over heating on the way back.

Phil [Entry 58]

Well I was on vacation on the Oregon Dunes during Dune Fest 2015. It was our last day Saturday and we went out for a night ride. I was the last one in our line of vehicles. I was zig zagging back and forth across the dunes. When I took a too sharpe of a turn at about 35-40 MPH and rolled my RZR. I rolled at least 1 1/2 time and landed on my side with my left elbow pinned under the door edge. I was strapped in with my 4 point harness and was able to release my harness. I had to wait about five minutes or more before the my group noticed that I was not there. I shure could have used a rugged radio to call for help to roll my RZR back on all fours. I bent the roll cage and both rear axles, broke the plastic on all four fenders as well as the bed, plus I bruised my left elbow. At least I did this on the last day of my vacation rather than the first !

Matt [Entry 68]

I'm a student pilot. I'll start with that. I've spent the last year and change dumping every last penny I make into fueling aircraft and working towards my ratings. Part of the penny pinching included, admittedly, a less than top quality headset with which to communicate to the world outside pf my little aluminum rocket. So here I am, probably less than 15 hours of instruction in, hurtling through time and space a couple thousand feet above the ground outside of Lexington, KY - a relatively busy airport on this sunny afternoon - with (thankfully) my instructor. Lexington approach is doing a fine job of keeping us all aware of our own little piece of airspace and my instructor and I are chatting along about, ironically, communications with the tower when he is suddenly, mid sentence, cut off. Now, trainer airplanes are kind of loud. So when the headset goes out, everything else kind of drowns out in the drone of horizontally opposed 4 cylinder sitting up front. The only noise louder than that engine at that moment was the sound of my butthole slapping shut as it hit me that I could no longer communicate verbally with, well, anyone. I looked over and could see my instructor, blissfully unaware that his "pilot-in-command-in-training" just lost his comms. Hell, I didn't even know whether he was still able to talk to the outside world. Luckily, after some improvised hand gestures, no shortage of confusion, and a couple radio calls, we established that I was the only one in the plane without communication.

Luckily the only damage for the day was a couple extra grey hairs, one inop headset, and an impromptu lesson on no-comm flight. Still, would have been nice to have had a good Rugged Radio instead.

No pics from that flight, so here's the Lexington city lights at night.

Dave [Entry 75]

Here's my son Cody ( who has cerebral palsy ) learning to drive his new tank chair using our RH - 5 rugged radios and headsets.

Tyler [Entry 76]

This October our family made its first trip up to Mammoth mountain (June Lake) . Must say that the trails up there are outstanding to say the least! So I decided to take our RZR 1000 out for a quick "Solo spin" never a good idea ! Not 10 mins into the ride I noticed a cool little track like trail that had a cool up hill berm that I couldn't resist! So I pinned it! Well all was good until I hit the "cool berm" ! This is where I Ran Out of Talent .... Little did I know the the berm was actually super soft sand over what seemed to be gravel . My passenger side front wheel dug in, and before I knew it my beloved RZR was on its side ! I do have a regular radio set up in my car, but that did me no good at this point because I was by myself and my wife and kids we're back at camp with no handheld or base camp communication set up. I was stranded with a good distance of walking ahead of me! Luckily I was not injured and the cage and harnesses did thier job! Moral of the story it's not a good idea to go on a solo mission especially if you don't have a base camp radio set up !

 

Daryl [Entry 1]

Finally got my yamaha yxz geared up the way i needed it with saftey gear (only basic hamdheld radio though) and on our first day of our first glamis trip this season i was leading two others in Glamis sand dunes and neither of them had radios, i was keeping an eye out for them behind me, which everyone always seems to want me to lead cause i have been riding the dunes for 32 years. First time ever i flinched and missed a drop with a 3 foot sand ledge on the other side, like one out of nowhere. I landed like a Jart, better known as a lawn dart and then fell to right side. The guys following immediately uprighted me and we found front end buckle and wheels plowing out. They were very concerned as it looked undriveable for sure. I said hell we are only about a mile as a crow flies to Gecko rd. So i got back in and to everyones amazement i powered that little yamaha out of there through some big dunes and drove it to the road. Could have called for help and to notify my wife back at camp if i would have had a 50 watt radio at least. I took it hard to the chest, luckily that was all considering i am barely able to drive sometimes due to major back surgeries and bone issues, got lucky. Car in shop now and frame, roll cage bent and all front control arms and tie rods. Looks like going to fix frame and all to get back out there soon. :-(

Chris [Entry 2]

First off thank you for everything that you guys do for the off-road industry! It happened to be my 3rd trip out in my prerunner, finally after 2 years of endless hours spent in the garage! It was New Years weekend out in Gordon's wells.. I was finally able to enjoy some simple seat time when all of a sudden my rear tire flew off my truck and ended up in the canal, not only was I alone but I was miles from my camp! This is when I realized I had no way to reach out to my family to come help save me!! Luckily people like you guys in this industry are so awesome an willing to help! Ended up taking me 3 hours to get back to camp with my truck! Here's a little video someone was using to film kids riding an caught it all on film for me!

Dallas [Entry 3]

I was with a group of guys at Glamis dunning when I was at the end of the line when I had a trailing arm break when I crested a hill. I rolled 6 times down into the bowl of the dune. i was down there for about 30-45 minutes before they came back and found us. If I had had a rugged radio setup I could have gotten help to us quicker. I ended up with a broken collar bone, and Camp RZR came out to help with my RZR.

Mike [Entry 4]

I was with my family travelling to California on a bathroom break ..I turned off the highway and planned a number one trip to the desert in Desert Springs California. While taking care of business a heard a familiar noise. I stepped backward still unzipped and in midstream. I tripped on a rock and landed on yes...a Rattle snake !!! I tried to get away frantically to no avail I was bit and in a very sensitive part. I immediately cried out in pain! Not sure if I should zip up or wait for the swelling to go down. I panicked and realized I needed to get to the hospital right away. I sure could have used a rugged radio right then to call for help!!! I watched as the snake wriggled away and wondering what was going to happen next on this ill fated trip.

Brittany [Entry 5]

We were at the desert, night time came thought he a great idea to go on a ride. We have a 11 year old and 8 mo old. Brought drinks, jackets and what not. So set out on our adventure. Well everyone shut their lights off and we couldn't find camp. So we drove around and around and around. I just said well let's just stop so we have enough gas to get back to camp and we will just sleep out here. When we have day light we can get our bearings again and find camp. My 11 year old was like cool!! I'm freaking out because we had our baby out but knew I had enough stuff to keep him warm. Oooh I told my husband get a flag pole with a light for our trailer and not rely on others for camp makers!!!

Ben [Entry 6]

My buddy and I went trail riding in Hollister Hills during a break in our rainy season. Two RZRs and a pretty empty park had the makings of an awesome day of adventure and good trails. Bonus was no dust due to recent rains.

We had run about every trail possible twice and kept looking for harder and harder challenges. I was leading down an unmarked trail along the properties boundary when the trail turned into a 4 foot deep rain rut and got steeper the farther down we went. We stopped halfway down and decided it was too steep and slippery to climb back up so we pushed onward. Eventually a slipped on the mud and fell into the deep rut. In doing so I popped a tire off the bead of one of my back wheels. There I was sitting sideways in a 4’ rut, about to roll over and with one flat tire.

For recovery gear we had straps and one come along. Not much to attach to but after much work I got turned around. The other RZR that was on the uphill side managed to get turned around on his own. He was able to just barley get back to the top of the hill and then walk down to help me. We tried and tried to get enough traction with 3 tires and a steep muddy hill but no luck. Finally we made the decision to go back to the base camp and some jeepers we saw earlier for some help (winch).

We left one of our passengers with the stuck RZR and headed back to camp. By now it was beginning to rain again and getting close to dark. Back at camp we found the jeepers getting ready for dinner and cooking carnitas under a canopy. They said no problem to helping us but insisted we eat first. Man those were some good carnitas. By now it was an hour after we left our passenger in the rain and cold. We couldn’t be too pushy asking for help but we definitely were getting anxious to get back to him and feeling a little guilty about stopping for dinner on the way for help.

Eventually the troops mobilized and we headed back to the steep hill with about 8 rigs, mostly Jeeps and Toyota trucks. One rig was decked out like a full blow expedition vehicle, a Land Rover. He seemed to be the lead and most willing to try and get us out. I lead him down the hill and showed him down the hill to my RZR. We surveyed the situation and he decided he would try a strap to the front of my RZR and simply drive backwards up the hill. After getting all strapped up with me and my passenger in the RZR, he begins backing up to give a little tug and hopefully pull us up the slimy 200 yard hill. At the end of the tug his Land rover stops and the back end comes up in the are about 3 feet. We didn’t move an inch. The look on his face was classic. Wide eyes looking right at us, I’m sure mine was the same. I thought for sure I was about to get a Land rover flipped onto my RZR.

It was quickly decided that he would go farther uphill and use his winch for a more controlled pull. After some winching and driving he finally got me to the top of the hill. I thanked him and his crew for dinner and the rescue, limped back to the trailer on 3 good tires, in the pouring rain.

Since this trip both RZRs have spare tires, Winches and other rescue equipment. One thing we don’t have is radios. As budget allows we want to get radios in the car so we could have stopped sooner on this hill by talking about it along the way. We also want portables so we can give them to others who join our group and to coordinate rescues such as this one. A radio at base camp would be good to let folks know when we get delayed on our next adventure.

Thanks for considering me for this prize. Ben

Rick [Entry 7]

I have had a lot of health problems recently so I went out on a limb and spent money to buy me a Polaris Turbo and try to have some fun no matter how short or long I live but to find out that they do not play favorites to poor people and I would love to make my machine looking good as I could to display the Polaris name unfortunately their parts are so expensive I've been stuck to install only the necessary like have bumpers roof windshield vent no radio no skid plate I want so much to get front and rear heavy duty raised a arms and driveshaft. But unfortunately now with my finances we can't even afford to travel to have fun so everything is put on hold stuff for making payments. But I do have to admit the time that we did take it out and whenever I can will be some of the funnest times I've had since I was a kid. Just wish life was more fair two people that worked hard all their life just to break even. But if you go out and charge a fortune on your credit cards a government will help you pay them off it don't make sense only in America except for us who are Caucasian and it works to keep perfect credit to have no fun with.

Thanks for considering me for this prize.
Ben

Rafe [Entry 8]

On a recent run to Randsburg firm our comfy spot in Jawbone we certainly could have used som Rugged Radio's. We all left with a set of handhelds we have for our Jeeps. One radio in the front and one in the rear we thought we would be fine since our group was only 5 deep and all RZRs. Well this could not have been further from the truth. With the conditions being dry and very dusty we have plenty of space in between each other leaving the opportunity for some to make a wrong turn and cut off from the group. All was well on the way over but as we decided to leave our destination some wanted to take the road back and others wanted to take the trail. The trailblazers went on with out communications and ended up being way out from camp, almost InyoKern Anyway they had to keep moving as there were motorcycles with us as well and the sun was setting quick. They were finally able to get cell service for better directions and make it back to camp but not before it was dark so they had to ride there last bit in the dark. Had they had com's they could have navigated a better route to back by dark. All ended well and it's a great story but Com's would have been a great asset.

Fernando [Entry 9]

Went on a,snow run after a new build- ls swap, full hydro, and front 4 link redo. Snow wheeling and all of a sudden driver's tires went into the fender well. Snapped the 60 housing, tried welding it to limp it back though didn't hold and ratchet strapped the tire underneath the axle and skied it onto the trailer to get home. Lucky it was in the snow it slid onto the trailer pretty easy.

Mark [Entry 10]

This happened a time ago on the trail to eagle peak. I had convinced my Bay Area cousins to come camping and wheeling with my wife and I. We had just my truck a 1980 GMC Jimmy named Susan. I had bought that truck not running with no rear ended and built it all up myself. We took our time getting out there and had a wonderful time. Weather was great but then it turned. Getting colder the third day we decided to head in. We packed up and started back but the wet had joined with the cold and on a decent things got a little dicey. In order to get straight I had to hit a small rock, a smallish boulder half buried with my rear tire.

Big Bang and we went up and over no big deal but I noticed I was dog tracking. I stopped on a flat spot and saw that I had broken my right rear leaf spring. I had a CB radio and couldn't get anybody on that to save my life. We were seriously in a bad place with weather building no food and no means of self repair. Maybe a days walk from pavement I was getting ready to make a tough choice when my cousin pulled out a little FRS radio. Only used two AA batteries could not believe I could hear people. Couldn't talk to them though. I walked a mile to the edge of the ridge so I could look straight down into Niagra and eagle meadow and started trying to get some response.

After half an hour and with the batteries dying I got two kids playing around between their parents trucks. I finally convinced one of them to let me talk to an adult and I arranged for them to call a friend in town to snag me a leaf from the junkyard and drive it out to us. Trouble was the battery had died and I never heard if they had copied the phone number I gave them. I walked back in the rain pissed and miserable. Decided that if I was going to walk out I would do it in the morning. We made camp best as we could with the storm hitting pretty good and just focused on staying warm and dry. 4 hours later we heard a truck motor and it was out friend. The message had gone out. Susan is long gone but I haven't forgotten how a little tiny radio made a big big difference. I'd like to have a big radio and hopefully make a bigger difference to someone else.

All the best Mark

Wayne [Entry 11]

No real "Badge of Honor" story here. I try very hard to PREVENT these things which I feel all should strive to do. Guess this comes from riding solo about 80% of the time ( not by choice) here in Northern Arizona. Logged over 15,000 miles with a GPS & Spot Satellite Messenger. Spent a brief stint in the County SAR program but too many attitudes there. I know this story is not exactly what you were looking for but I felt it was needed to be mentioned. Accidents are , well just that, ACCIDENTS but most can be prevented or minimized. I see folks trekking off into the desert totally unprepared only to have the inevitable happen. Don't be the victim, be prepared as best you can. Give yourselves and others a better chance to enjoy the experience. Thanks for listening. Trail etiquette is also a lost art, sadly. Be safe and be back.

Alex [Entry 12]

So we were at Gray Rock for an event and decided we needed to make a quick run to the store. Well on the way back we took a detour to some different trails that were not in the park. It was just 2 of my friends and myself in my XJ. We came up on a few side by sides and pulled off to the side a little. After they drove past I went to go forward and started sliding down the hill and ended up with my passenger door up against a tree.

I didn't have a winch at the time nor did any of our phones have service. I ended up having to drive my way out of the situation which resulted in both passenger doors smashed, the passenger front window breaking, the passenger front mirror destroyed and the rear hatch door broken in half. Once I finally got back on the actual trail steam started coming from under the hood. I stopped the Jeep and got out to see coolant pouring from under the vehicle. I went to the back to grab a rag and the whole rear hatch door fell down to the ground.

After fighting to get the door to stay I finally went to open the hood and find that the harmonic balancer came apart and threw the belt into the upper radiator hose. With no phone service and no radio we had to sit and wait for the Jeep to cool off so we could drive it a little until it got hot again. We did this 4 times, which took about 3 hours, before we got far enough to get phone service so we could call our friends who were right down the road to come help us with some parts and coolant. Had I had a Rugged Radio at the time I could have had help out there before I started destroying my Jeep.

Ryan [Entry 13]

So I bought a chopped xj when I was stationed down south. When I got out of the army I brought it home to Ohio. I was storing it at my inlaws and the day we got it out there we had the whole family there. We had been relaxing and having a few when a few family members wanted to go for a ride. We were bouncing along in the woulds having a good time when I started to have trouble with the steering after climbing over some big logs. After looking it over I ripped the track bar mount away from the unibody. Fast forward a couple months even broken it saved my brother in laws truck and while using it to save my other brother in laws quad we decided to play around. Well we ended up stuck good in the creek. While trying to get out the seals blew out on the steering box and sprayed power steering fluid on the glowing header. Flash fire went up but luckily I had a few extinguishers in the cab. The fire didn't really do any damage but the jeep was down. Then got the ford 8n stuck trying to get the xj out. And had to call a neighbor with his bigger tractor. We had to clear a trail just to get the tractor in. We got everything out but it was the jeeps last run before being sold. It might have been great but it was a fun rig.

Jerry [Entry 14]

We dune in the Imperial sand dunes. We camp in the Gorden's Well area and have as many as 20 RVs in our group. This is the first year we have had radios and they have been a god send. In the past with 15 to 25 UTV/ATVs on a run its been tough to keep things under control. If someone breaks down or has a problem we lose riders and destroy the fun in the trip. Since many of us now have Rugged radios we never have a problem, someone stops, we radio and the group is safe. Last trip we had a medical emergency, with a radio I was able to quickly join the UTV with problems, and help resolve the issue. Due to fast response, the person was fine and ride continued! Thanks Rugged Radio!

Michel [Entry 15]

On my way to get to the top of the mountain, my front wheel sleep to the left so I need to back up to get my Jeep in line.

I only forgot the details that just behind my left rear wheel, there was a 2 feet drop...oups, I sleep over on the top.

See the picture for the final result and look at the big drop in front of my jeep. Thanks to the small threes to hold me there.

The challenge was to get the Jeep back on his wheels in the middle of the mountain.

Friends winched me back on my 4 wheels. A costly experience...

Ryeder [Entry 16]

first experience on the rubicon was less then desireable. our goal was to wheel to buck, camp there for a day or two and wheel back to loon.

Before sluice I blew out both rear shafts. Since I had a rear shaft, one of the guys I was with said, oh well you can still make it to buck, its not far. that's when the day turned to complete shit. on the way to buck I broke a front shaft, and bent my tierod. so my buddies winched me to buck. after taking the rest of the day to drag my ass to buck, we found a campsite at 11pm(started towards buck at noon). we pulled my rear shaft, and found out the race for the beating had fallen off and out of the rig somewhere on the trail. we had heard that they were going to shut down the bridge at the springs around noon on Sunday, so our goal was to get passed that and drag me out the Tahoe side where one of the buddies I was with had a cabin with a car we could take to the loon side to get my trailer.

So as we are dragging me out, and me trying to drivie in 1 wheel drive with my front driver side we get into a rock section and I end up braking the other shaft. now ive got no drive. Where we were at was on a slope, a little ways up was a flat spot where we could park the rig. As we were trying to pull and push me up a lsmall ledge, my ball joint lets loose on the passenger side.

Seeing as this was the weekend after jeepers jamboree, there was practically no one on the trail. We only had one other rig, a 2 seater Toyota buggy. We had to hike out from about a mile past buck all the way to loon where our trucks and trailers were parked.

We ended up recovering the rig a week later, having to bring in a rebuilt 9in, chromo shafts for my 44, and 4 new ball joints.

A rugged radio could have been great help on this trip, that's for sure.

Aaron [Entry 17]

So once I was at this party,when I was like 16, and I was supposed to leave with this girl well my girlfriend showed up and we were hanging out or what ever and like ten minutes later the girl I was going home with asked me if we could leave right in front of my girl..... The time I was stuck in a bad situation.

Bradley [Entry 18]

KOH 2016, Shootout Event @ Chocolate Thunder. Stuck in the cab of my truck with a rugged radio and a camera. This is accidental footage, to funny.

Noel [Entry 19]

November 2016 my wife and I went out with a couple of buddy's to some local trails . after 3 hour of wheel'en it was getting pretty nasty out very muddy and the trails were greasy. we decided we should get on the road exiting the last trail I slid down this harsh declining hill like a bobsled, no control into a stump that broke the output shaft on my power steering box.

Both of my friends left in there rigs to get there tow rig and trailer. after 45 minutes they returned with out the tow rig and said that the road was washed out and they would have to go a different route. 1.5 hours later they showed up with the trailer and said they had to get a push from a excavator because the road was so bad.

CB radios don't work very well in the mountains, so it would have been sweet to have some rugged radios that day!

Jacob [Entry 20]

Wheeling down fordyce one night an the whole group stopped an was about a half mile behind an flopped my old rig over on a ledge an had to hike back an find everyone to come roll me back over

Dalton [Entry 21]

So crazy adventure I had was family and I where at place called Disney Oklahoma there is a waterfall you can crawl up if your fully equipped with winch radios ya know the good stuff to communicate and to successfully crawl up the falls without going over the side uncle ray decided to invite me I own a 92 YJ sitting on 3inch lift and 35s stock axles and no lockers no winch but he said it's fine we have winches on our trucks if you get in a bind haha sooo we are all out jeepin around and come too the falls man I'm nervous it's worse to see the falls in person and see my jeep compared to there crawlers they go up and it's my turn so ray pulls his jk up to the edge of the falls and they hook the winch to my jeep just in case it goes off the edge well every body's yelling and hollaring because I was only one without radio as I start to climb the falls my jeep starts to slide side ways and I'm yelling telling them start winching and they don't so I went over the falls and pulled rays jeep damn near down the falls with me thankfully I wasn't hurt and finally got up the falls ended up breaking axle shafts in the front all in all greatest adventure I've ever been on.

Nathan [Entry 22]

On hells revenge in Moab, Utah, I was about half a mile ahead of the rest of the group and the trail had a big downhill crawl that was real wet and you couldn't tell it was wet until I slid down the hill. I needed to warn the other and we didn't have cell service, rugged radios would've been perfect for this situation.

Dallon [Entry 23]

So, first off... If you've never heard of "ghost riding your whip", it basically means jumping out of your moving vehicle while going at a slow speed (ex: 5mph), walking along side of it as its moving, and jumping back in.

So, back in the summer of 2015, I had arranged for a short jeep ride up the canyon with a few of my Jeep buddies. Towards the end of the day, i decided for whatever reason that it would be a good idea to "ghost ride my Jeep" since the doors were off. Well, everything went smooth until I went to jump back into the moving vehicle and tripped on a rock. The rear drivers side wheel ran right over my ankle. The tread tore a huge chunk of flesh right out from it. we were 45 minutes from the nearest hospital and my ankle was bleeding heavily. You could see my tendons. Anyway, long story short, i could barely walk on that ankle for the entire remainder of the summer as it healed. and it costed my parents a very large hospital bill.

Luckily, i had another friend in my jeep that was able to drive me to the hospital, but I could have definitely benefited from having a rugged radio on hand incase the situation was worse, or I didn't have another driver.

Thats my story... pretty funny huh?

Rugged Radios Edit: Dallon had another great photo, but the injury made us squirm. Trust us, it's wicked.

Hunter [Entry 24]

I was riding co-pilot in my buddy's Jeep Wrangler and it was the first time taking it out for some rock crawling. We went out to a place called Charloues Gap. After about 5 hours we get to a difficult spot that has two lines. While trying to maneuver from one line to the other the front brake line got caught on the tire and was ripped of cause us to lose brakes and almost roll backwards. After backing down using only the e brake we knew we had to call for help since we had to parts or tools. We had to hike up a huge mountain just to get service. We got ahold of my dad who was gonna take his dirt bike to meet us with parts but he was so far away we decided to start slowing heading back using the e brake as our only brake. After about half a mile we realized the the rear track bar mount was broken and the tire was rubbing on the frame. After several hours we got a new brake line and getto rigged a chain to act as a track bar we got the jeep back to the front.

Shea [Entry 25]

We were at the dunes for Halloween and on a big night ride of about 14 rzrs. At our first pit stop we realized we had a missing rzr to our group. After back tracking and searching for about 2 hours we had found our missing rzr friend stuck in a witches eye with a front wheel torn off. There's no cell service in the middle of the dunes so we would of greatly benefitted from a rugged radios car to car kit. We did find him but it took way longer than we liked. With a car to car we could've know by the next bowl that he was broke. Hopefully we can get everyone else to join in on the rugged products when we win the contest

Ben [Entry 26]

I was on my way home from a great weekend of camping and wheeling when the stock steering failed on my yj and i rolled of the road over the edge about 50'. would have loved to have a ruged radio in that situation. Needless to say after that went home got online and got my self a ruff stuff 1 ton steering kit!

Anthony [Entry 27]

Went a a trail run for my buddies bachelor's party,snow was coming down pretty bad and we we're plowing through 2 feet of fresh powder making huge ruts, after a couple nights of partying woke up and cleaned up camp, we all headed out and I was last one inline, snow was almost completely gone and ruts full of muddy water, steering started feeling loose and Jeep was going left when turning right and right when turning left. Figured it was just the mud so kept on, started Falling behind and had no working horn, did my best to follow fresh tracks but ended up taking a wrong turn and while going down a steep grade completely lost control of steering and started sliding into a huge ditch and knew it was gonna be bad. With my Jeep starting to drive head first into ditch I hit my driver wheel into wall and Jeep started going over, but somehow while looking at the ground from my driver window coming close it dropped back down on all fours. After a few minutes sitting there got out and looked for something broke but couldn't see anything with all the mud. I backed out the ditch and attempt to drive but wheel was all over the place. Drove 5 miles an hour for about 45 minutes with wheel flapping around until I popped out in Yosemite National Park in front of a gas station somehow. Found that I had broke 2 of my 3 high steer bolts. Worse thing is I put my tools and high lift jack in my buddies jeep. Still no service and station closed, waited for 2 houRS before a random guy helped my rachet strap and drill a hole in knuckle. Beat a bolt in front hole and made it to a parts store. Ended up driving 2 hours home at 30mph. If only I had a rugged radio I could have just called the guys for help and never got lost

Josh [Entry 28]

Went on my first UTV ride in the mountains of WV only to become separated from the main group on multiple occasions. The first of which was the very first ride and it was at night no less. Before we left it was made very clear you were to keep an eye on the guy behind you and stop if you lost visual so as to create a chain event to the front of the pack. In doing so the last few of us were separated as the person in front of myself did not stop. Thankfully we had a local in the back to show us the way. However, it happened another time later that night. This time the local that was separated with us knew how to get back to camp so to speak but was not familiar with where the main group was heading. We searched for their tracks up and down the mountain side for some time before finally sitting in one place and hearing the machine of the group leader going up and down the mountains looking for us. It took some time but he did manage to collect us and return us to the group. Definitely an eye opening experience for my first time in mountainous terrain. Through the course of the weekend it happened a couple more times but I wasn't in the separated group every time. We even managed to have the group get divided and lost from one another with the front and rear persons having a small means of communication. It was an adventure and still had a good time but it could have been more enjoyable had we not spent as much time stopped/looking for separated/lost vehicles. I think having a few vehicles with communications throughout the group would have been best and hopefully next time that will be the case as I do plan to partake in more adventures.

Steven [Entry 29]

Me and my buddy took a wrong turn had to walk 2miles to find my help could have really used some sweet radios

Michael [Entry 30]

So I spent 2 months prepairing and left my family on Thanksgiving to go out to the Southern Nationals for the $25k purse in Ga. It consisted of two 10 lap short course heats and one 3hr night endurance race. Unfortunately less than 1 minute into the 1st heat I was running forth and got tangled up with the 5th place car going over a jump that caused me to tumble down the track around 50mph rolling 6-7 times. Luckily I was wearing my pyrotech/rugged radios helmet so walked away with only bruising & a minor concussion but had me and my spotter had a full rugged radio set up he could have radioed me to caution of who was around and where I needed to be on the track so I would have still been competing for the podium. Unfortunately it was lesson learned that Rugged Radios can give you the advantage and beused as a safety precaution when open wheel racing. See you guys at the track in 2017.

Bob [Entry 31]

I live in Big Bear california where we sometimes get snow and once in a great while we get a lot of snow ! For the last 19 years I have worked for the City of Big Bear Lake which in the winter means snow plowing . It was 2010 and I was getting off a 22 hour shift plowing the first 4 feet of what eventually became 6 feet of snow and I was given a six hour window to try to get home, sleep and try to get back to do it again. On my way home there were cars and trucks if all sizes stuck everywhere , and traffic came to a complete stop , a Von's truck and gas truck were stuck on the highway blocking my way home . I didn't want to wait all night and needed sleep so I went for it and drove straight up a side street too steep to plow and there was a full 4 ft ... My boss pulled in right behind me in his Ram 2500 diesel . I made it to the top but barely and was very exited until I realized my boss didn't ! I backed back down to him and attempted to pull him up but he was far too heavy for my cj7 even locked up. Well that's when things got bad . I got myself stuck trying the pull, and nobody was going to pass by to help because nobody wants to attempt this hill with that much snow. We had no way to call for help. I had no shovel and no chains so I thought we were going to freeze to death . What I did have was a piece of 5/8 rope , so I cut it in half and tied a peice to each front wheel and wrapped it around the tire and back through the wheels about 6 times and there they were "redneck chains"! it wasn't pretty and they wouldn't last long but it was enough to pull myself out and go get a shovel to help pull out my boss.would have been nice to call for help on a rugged radio. I was so happy we made it home that I didn't mind that there was only a couple hours left to sleep!

Jason [Entry 32]

Less than 12 hours after I bought the jeep I took it out to test out 4wd and lockers. Ended up driving across what seemed a dried up river bed, got halfway across and felt the jeep drop 2 feet into what seems like black tar/quicksand and reeked of rotten feces. Tried using a shovel to did my way out but as soon as I moved to the next tire the other hole I did filled back up. I broke 2 winch cables, and a few tow straps in the process of winching myself out. Tried using my cb radio to contact anyone nearby since I had limited cell service and ended up having to walk miles back to the highway and flagging someone down to catch a ride back into town. The next day brought out a few more jeeps and a 1 ton cummins dually and ended up breaking a bubba rope, and destroyed my rear bumper from all the yanks but 48 hours later I was out. If I had a rugged radio I could of reached out further to get some assistance getting off the trail.

Greg [Entry 33]

My story begins at Parker Az. On oct 8 2016 I was racing my class 5 and got stuck after changing a flat. We got out and got moving, rite after that race I was teamed up on a motorcycle for the next race, we finished that and after resting I was standing at the finish line waiting on a friends class 10 to come in, while standing there I fell over dead. My son and friend started working on me. The late great man Casey Folks got on his RUGGED radio and called medics who showed up in time to take over and bring me back from the be beyond. That call on a RUGGED radio saved my life. Thank you Casey and Rugged for your reliable radios.

Jarrod [Entry 34]

So it was the time of mcr 2015 going down, when we were trying to wheel and didnt want to deal with all the traffic on the trails due to mcr. So we decided to go to Fordyce to get away from the havoc. So we went , unloaded everything and aired down. Hit the trails and there wasn't anyone in sight. Just crossed the mini creek crossing (not commite) and the trail narrowed and my buddy didn't notice that he had veered off the trail and began side hilling. He was not able to drive out due to being like a teeter totter. We tried to get him out but it made him roll off the cliff almost going into the creek. Might I ad it was only his truck and another four runner on yota axles. After tons of tugging and pulling and trying to figure the smartest way we finally got him on all 4 wheels and he was able to turn it on and get tugged up the hill. Long day and lots of excitement when we finally got out.

Dennis [Entry 35]

A group of us went up to Elbe, WA. to the OHV park and I lead the group. No one said anything about the mud holes being so deep. They swallowed my 39.5 Boggers and flooded the cab of my S10. I had my daughter aka Princess in the cab in both of these. She was pissed..not really but could of used a good radio to talk to the group in front of us.. A "heads up" would of been good. All in all it was a really fun day with friends on the trail.

Nick [Entry 36]

Sadly I do not have a cool or scary story about being in a situation where I needed a radio. I an very new to off roading and jeeps. But I can say one of these prizes would prevent any type of scary situation I could get into. I would be oh so grateful for a prize like this!

Steve [Entry 37]

Ended up on my lid near the top of a very steep climb. Thankfully, after a tbit of careful winching (3 winches), I was at the top and wheeled the rest of the weekend!

Brandy [Entry 38]

Michael and I went on our first date in 2000. We went on a night ride with friends. I rode on the back of his banshee 4 wheeler through the hollars of Kentucky. That was 17 years ago! Today, riding is a family affair. We started a UTV group called Trail Junkies UTV Club with 15 of our closest friends. Over the past 3 years, it has grown to over 2500 members. Last year we had to opportunity to enjoy South Dakota and ride the Needles Hwy to Mt. Rushmore. We also went to Rally in the Pines in Mackey, Idaho and finished the trip in Moab before loading up our toy hauler and coming home. With any ride, communication is key and sometimes a matter of getting people safely down the mountain. Our group does a ride every year called the Trail Blazin ride. We started this ride 3 years ago and the first trip we had 22 people (11 buggies). The second year, the numbers were doubled. We used Cobra radios and made sure we had someone in front, middle and back with radios. This ride is an endurance and skilled ride through the Tennessee Mtns. We pack for 4 days and head out. Food, clothing, tools, gear, whatever you may need...you pack it! We camp out each night, then head back out the next morning. The first time we did the trip we did 168 miles. With more people on the second trip, we were only able to reach 138 miles. During the trek through the mountains the terrain can change from trail to trail. You do not know what the trail will be like and if you have a mishap or get separated, it would be nice to communicate with the people in the back of the convoy. Also, if something happens in the back, they can radio to the front and let us know to stop and wait. The Rugged Radios could become a necessity for our Trail Blazin ride.

Luke [Entry 39]

Traveling solo, I got stuck axle deep in the stickiest mud I have ever seen miles from anywhere in the middle of Baja. Definitely would have been nice to have a radio to call if any help was nearby. Four hours of digging and laying in mud and muddy water was not the best way to end the day.

Jarrod [Entry 40]

A few years back some friends and I planned a trail run at a local area. We all met at the gas station to fuel up and were off. I had just done some work on the front end which lead to a horrific death wobble. I got no more than 2 miles down the road before I decide I had to turn around. I ended up having to drive home doing no more than 20mph and put an old steering stabilizer on to temporarily "fix" By the time I got to the air down spot the whole crew left and started the trails without me. I was the only one without a functioning radio and did not have any cellphone service to contact them. I ended up driving for over an hour through the trails until by chance I finally found the rest of the crew. Really could've used a radio that day

Ryan [Entry 41]

Poison Spider Mesa - Moab A 2013 business trip opened the door for a bucket list trip from Asheville, NC to Moab. After flying into Denver, I rented a car and drove to Moab, where I rented a jeep and hit as many trails as I could in 24 hours.I was hoping to meet up and tag along with some other wheelers, but evidently mid-week in mid-July it's a little scarce out there. On the way back down Poison Spider Mesa, I made a mistake and dropped off a ledge that was more than my rental Rubicon could handle. As soon as the front tires dropped off, I heard the sound of the LCA's and belly skid on the rocks. I'm high centered, teetering on the ledge. About 10 feet to my right, a 200ft drop off! I try forward and only slide futher right, towards the cliff. Open the door, get out to see the front tires are hanging in the air. After about 15 minutes of diagnosing my options and hoping to see someone else on the trail, I decided to try rocking the jeep, at least if the jeep rolled off the cliff I wouldn't be in it! Lifting the rear bumper and pushing, I was able to slide the jeep off the ledge enough that the front tires were on the lower rock. Once the front tires were down, a little 4-Lo + front locker and I escaped!

Robert [Entry 42]

In 2012 I rode my R1200gs Adventure to Alaska. After safely completing the trip to Arctic Ocean Near Pruhdoe Bay, I made way south and East to Tok for the night. I was nearly 4000 miles into the trip and would be needing a tire in another 1000 or so. The roads are damn rough on a bike in AK. I decided to head west the nest morning a few miles to catch the "top of the world Highway between Alaska and the Yukon. My riding companions were on more street oriented bikes and opted to head toward After several hours of hard riding I crossed the border and headed into the Yukon at a remote border crossing. I then started heading down toward the Yukon River. Rounding a bend at nearly 70 miles an hour the rear tire came loose and wobbled oddly. I stayed in the throttle and gradually backed out. I had to change my line and wound up using the whole road in order to keep from dropping the bike. I rolled to a stop and looked down but due to my luggage I could not see the rear tire. I dropped the side stand, crawled off the 600 pound beast and walked around to the rear. Tire was flat. WAY FLAT. I unpacked and used my compressor to air it up, but alas there was quite a hole. I tried patching the hole, but they would not hold. It had been nearly an hour and I hadn't seen anyone since the border crossing. I decided to setup camp, then I pulled the wheel off the bike and tried to finagle two or more plugs into the hole. I hit the spot messenger button on my SPOT device to send a preconfigured message to my wife in California so she would know the reason I stopped was for the night, and not the I had wrecked or something. No cars came by that evening.

The next morning I got up and warmed up a mountain house meal on the top of my pannier box and then settled in to start plugging away at this tire once again. After several attempts I was getting pretty damn frustrated. I knew eventually someone would be buy today as its a fairly well used road during the hours of the operation of the ferry, but I really wanted to get this handled asap. I had one more option deeply packed in my bike. In the very bottom of my gear I found the inner tube. Now my bikes tires are tubeless. But I had bought the damn thing as a backup a few years before as a way to limp into a location where a better repair could happen. After fighting with the tire and wheel for a bit I had the damn thing in place and the wheel reseated. I finished airing the dirty bastard up and got enroute. I wasn't sure that the stem would take much abuse at speed so I putted down to the ferry. I checked everything out, and it appeared ok. Crossing the Yukon river I got some grub and borrowed a landline to call my friends and let them know I was running behind. They had remained in Whitehorse and would meet me at the Honda shop, where I could get a new rear tire. After lunch I meandered toward Whitehorse, pulling in with about two hours to spare and got the tire replaced. The shop showed me some wear on the rubber stem but liked my bakup idea and the fact that it got me all the way to them. In hindsight radio may have helped me contact the guys the night before and would have been a good idea. Staying together would have been a good idea, but I'd have missed the "top of the world", which would have been unacceptable. I checked through all my photos and while I didn't have any photos of the tire ordeal, I have a before and after on the "top of the world" why, and again at the yukon river.

Randy [Entry 43]

On March 12, 2016 my girlfriend and I and two of her friends wanted to go on a razor ride because they were thinking of purchasing a razor. We went out south of Boise Idaho to Murphy which is open desert, and for months my friends and I who all have Polaris razor XP four 1000's have ripped up the desert out there the trails are very familiar to us sand washes to rock crawling to high-speed areas. on this day it was like any other day clear skies great weather and fun times but recently we had rain. Not thinking anything of it we had a great time and in the high-speed areas I was showing my friends what the razors can do it jumps well handles great but as we crest of a hill it turned right and dog leg which I was familiar with the rain had washed out A good portion of the road. In a split second to things to do hit the brakes and avoid a G out or hit the G out and hopefully the suspension worked as design. I chose to hit the brakes which when we landed cost of the razor to not stop slide sideways hit the washed out Ravine Road flips upside down and rack. Not when I wanted to do to my razor , And to my friends. Thank God I am aware of things that can happen we had four point racing harnesses by pro armor and we all wore helmets which prevented us from getting hurt. I had to walk 2 miles to a main road flag down a person and bring me to my truck with trailer go back and I had to winch it out of the ravine. Since then $ $16,500 of damage thank God for insurance. Razor is all upgraded to race roll cage and accessories, my next purchase is rugged radios and intercom system. Thanks for hearing my story Randy

Troy [Entry 44]

Went on our first trip to superstition New Years weekend and our first trip using our Rugged 360 headsets and our Rugged walkie talkies and while on our trip my buddy's son surprised him on leave from the Navy and his first trip out on their Polaris Razor 1000 he let his son borrow it with his girlfriend and while out on their ride they rolled his dad's razor it cracked the windshield and bent the roof and he denied rolling it his dad didn't press the issue because his son was on leave. The very next day on their ride together the dad rolled the razor (no injuries) and calling us on our Rugged radio for help, after that the son came clean.

The End!!!!

Ted [Entry 45]

My brother-in-law and I attended Elbe WA annual snow jam this year. When the beautiful day set to melting the latest snow we basked in some wheeling among the most amazing trails in the northwest. As sun set and temperatures dropped, the snowmelt quickly turned to ice. As we attempted to crest our final trail of the day, it had become a frozen waterfall. We were unable to reach the apex. We fell 25' short when his '96 TJ slid back and used my '86 Yota as an ebrake. We collected ourselves and commenced to winching the TJ up the peak. My bro-in-law, being the competitive spirit he is reveled in my need for him to turn around and winch my Yota up as well. With temps in the teens he disregarded any duty cycle as he gleefully began to winch me up. 5' from the top my forward progress stopped and I heard him scream over my motor that his Jeep was on fire. As I applied my parking brake with a shot of adrenaline, it retracted much further than normal indicating a broken something. I shut down the Yota, cranked the wheel and jumped out with zero abandon. As I crested I could see the hood of the TJ fly up as he flung it open to see the foot plus flames engulfing his battery. He extinguished the fire and we sat bewildered for a couple moments glad the TJ had only lost the battery and cable ends in the mini inferno. With my Yota less than 2 yards away and his TJ needing juice, it would have been ideal to have had the ability to contact the rest of our wheeling cadre on the other side of the valley. Instead, we spent the next 2+ hours making makeshift jumper cables out of his winch cable so we could fire up the TJ and pull my Yota the rest of the way up the ice. Nothing a cold beer and a great bowl of. Hili couldn't fix. Thanks guys.

Edward [Entry 46]

The day after Jeep Fest in Toledo, I was feeling anxious to get on some trails. Wheeling the next day was going great and I wasn't being gentle at all on my rig Short Bus. Lunch time came around where I spent most of it cleaning rocks out of two tire beads. Near the end of the day, I decided I could drive through almost anything. Back in the woods of Bundy Hill off road park, I found a passage I couldn't pass up. Half way in I knocked a tire off the rim. Trying to get yanked out by 3 Jeeps, I sheared my sector shaft. Then the rain came and it poured for an hour. Soaked, stuck, no steering and barely any cell service. Finally rescued 4 hours later by an excavator and that hole being named "The Bus Stop". Some Rugged Radios would have come in useful that day!

Steve [Entry 47]

So, there we were. At Rausch Creek doing our first club crawl competition. We were doing pretty well, hitting all of the harder lines, racking up the bonus points, feeling good. Until I decide to get a little overzealous, thinking I could set up on a bonus gate as my spotter was getting into position.

This particular obstacle was next to a larger, harder crawl area. There was a buggy trying an insane line, the crowd was going crazy. In my mind, I thought they were cheering me, lol. So it was loud, he was bouncing off of the rev limiter, crowd was cheering and I never heard my spotters instructions to readjust my line and I went for it. I rolled right off the rock and and onto my side...

Thankfully only my pride was hurt, and the jeep had a few bruises but no major damage. We righted it, cleared the cylinders of oil and motored on to a respectful 5th place in our first crawl comp.

Craig [Entry 48]

During a UTV trip in the mountains of eastern Ky, we had a large group out at night. The leader of the group made a turn up a hill, and as we made our way up to an overlook, we noticed headlights from a few in group, who had missed the turn, going below us. We had CB radios, and even though we could see them, they couldn't hear us on the CB. We watched them travel around the mountain on the trail below us until they went out of sight. We didn't run back into them until several hours later, lost and running out of fuel! With a Rugged Radio setup, we could have gotten in touch with them, and kept them going in the right direction!!

Christian [Entry 49]

A bunch of friends and I went out for what was suppose to be a quick run up to the top of 4 peaks here in AZ for a friends bachelor party. On they way back my buddy's can am maverick decided the steering rack wanted no more of the trip resulting in hard hard turn into the bar ditch. Well since we were far away from the trucks they had to improvise. The can am was lifted onto the back of a titan and drug all the way down the mountain. The radios would have helped because I kept going and had no idea the titan, which is equipped with car to car radios, almost lost the can am several times and kept over heating on the way back.

Trevor [Entry 50]

So one day in march me and a couple of buddies were bored and decided to go offloading in some local trails to take up some time. We called around and got a small group together and headed on our way. We entered the trails around 4:00pm and hopped out of our trucks to turn our hubs. With all of us in 4wd we were ready to hit the trails and began riding along. I had stuck to the right and had climbed a valley trail that was a little washed out and gets your suspension moving flexing like crazy and one of my friends took a nearby trail to attempt a steep hill climb. We were driving around for about half an hour before i stopped at the center where most of the main trails lead to on top of a hill looking over the woods. I tried to send out a message on my cb to tell my buddies to meet me at this location but our antennas couldn't get a good enough signal to hear each other. I think one of them said they were on their way towards me. I figured id shut my truck off and wait in the meantime. In my rear view mirror i see a man wearing s sweatshirt and jeans riding a yellow sports quad towards me. I kinda put my hand out of my window as a wave and he kept riding towards me. The quad shut off when he was about a cars length away and rolled to my truck until the quad hit my front drivers side tire. He hopped off the quad and yelled "give me your keys" I was confused and said "what?" He reached into my car and grabbed both of my hands saying give me your keys. I held the steering wheel as hard as i could and didn't know what to do. One of my friends saw something happening as he was approaching the area and the man turned and looked at him and yelled "give me your keys" once again to him. The man let go of my hands and ran towards my friends jeep. He saw what was happening and floored it. I panicked, turned my truck on, slammed it into reverse and cut away to turn around and follow my friend. I still don't know where my other friend was but we wanted to get to a safe area and headed to exit towards a main road. We were picking up a lot of dust since it was dry that day but i see my buddies cherokee approaching behind me in my rear view mirror, I hear what i think he is saying "go, go, go" but we continued cowards the exit in a speedy fashion. We all got out onto the road where we knew it was safer and kept driving since we knew those trails were not the right place to be in right now. We got out with all of our trucks but one thing i wish we had was better communication with each other and not all of us had the best cb radio set ups.

Matt [Entry 51]

I was working a week long remote medical job as a paramedic outside Kanab, Utah. I figured between a cell phone and CB I was set. WRONG! One of the first mornings of the event, I was on a trail headed to a remote check point with a few other event staff when I snapped an upper control arm on my Duramax, causing my drivers side 35 to roll under the vehicle, wreck the tie rods and grenade my diff in the process. Way outside of town, no cell service, nothing on CB, no radio, no way any tow truck would dare get me. I knew I was on a trail that was being used for the event so I started taking everything apart and waited for someone to come by. 5 hours later, a coworker with a radio stumbled upon me when we had yet to show at the checkpoint. We were able to call down to another person at the local NAPA on it, order all the parts and tools I needed to get it off the trail and con the poor kid behind the counter to drive the parts and tools out to me with his UTV when he got off work. Unfortunately, the show had to go on so my coworker loaded up the rest of the staff and headed out. I wrenched well into the night alone and not only did it drive off the trail(2wd of course) but I was actually able to finish the event and drive it the 6 hours home. Needless to say, if I was smart and had communication, I probably wouldn't have spent the night out there alone. How can you be mad with that view of the Grand Canyon though?am several times and kept over heating on the way back.

Matt [Entry 52]

I'm the VP of the Redding Dirt Riders MC Club and we love rugged radios. Rugged radios set up are radios to the same channels before we receive them. This is a top notch company with great service. We will always do business and refer rugged radios. Thank you for your great service, Matt

Tanner [Entry 53]

"Short" snow wheeling loop running with a local that was a friend of a buddy of mine that "knew" the area. Jan 1st couple years back which was a sunday and i had to be at work at 5am jan 2nd. Head out about 10am and its a hr long winch fest not even a mile from the tow rigs on the main rd in. Decide we are going to make this short loop that will take about 4hrs, i have 1/2 tank of fuel. Wheel for couple hrs and this warming cabin is always " right around the bend " for hrs. Had another local with us that blows radiator hose on yota p-up, patch it and continue on. This is about 4hrs in now and im down below 1/4 tank of fuel. Multiple "just down the trail" and "right around the bends" later we finally hit this cabin after multiple stucks, yota mentioned above having alternator problems, etc. Sun is now setting. Warming cabin is all locked up and now im at about 1/8 of a tank of fuel. Pull fuel line off of yota's carb and have him crank engine over to run fuel pump so i can fill coffee cup and dump into my blazer for the "short" remainder of the trail. Buddy of mine with rubicon is in the rear of the pack and is constantly burying himself and the yota with alt problems is continueing down trail by himself because alt is now completely dead and the truck is overheating off and on due to being low on coolant from small leak from rad hose duct tape patch, other yota is too light and not running beadlocks aired way down and cant budge rubicon everytime he would get stuck and afraid to hit him too hard and lose a bead. Buddy with a built samurai is also too light to get rubicon out. Sun is now set and we are in middle of forrest and it is just pouring down freezing rain. Im now looking at the low fuel light in my blazer and have had to stop, wait, then back track to find rubicon that has became stuck multiple times. Finally start to make some decent momentum and it is getting late now probably close to 7pm or little after. Catch up to yota with alt problems and he is now completely dead and stuck at a tree fallen across the trail. Good sized tree probably 18" or so diameter trunk that was long enough we couldnt tug it out of the way with how it had landed and fallen in the middle of the forrest between a bunch of other trees, trails so tight no way to go around it, and last other trail is miles back. Only saw we had was hand saw and we all took turns cutting away on that thing all while yotas are hooked together with jumper cables trying to get charge back into dead battery to keep moving. I steal some more coffee cup fulls of gas out of the running yota and some from the samurai. Finally get section of tree trunk cut out(2 cuts) and winch/pull a 8ft section away a little bit that we can drive over it and continue down trail...rubicon buries himself trying to get over the log. Pull him out again with my blazer and mile or so down the trail im looking at the low fuel light again. Finally get off this tight trail and hit one of the main roads/snowpark roads going up the mountain. Yota with the issues is up front and we tell him to just go and get as far as he can, samurai takes the back of the pack. Its about 9/9:30 now and weve been in freezing rain for hrs now. We all head down the twisty curving switchback road on single digit pressures and the road is a complete skating rink of ice. Couple miles down the road i lose the headlights of the samurai in the distance in the rear view mirror and stop and pull over. Wait 5 minutes or so and its time to back track again, let me remind you ive been looking at a low fuel light for awhile now. About mile back we find samurai lost it around a corner and flopped on its side on the shoulder of the road, some body damage and a broken window is luckily all that happened, driver and co pilot were fine other than being sore. Flip it back onto its wheels with the rubicon and get it fired back up. I steal fuel again from yota and samurai and we continue on all while being told "the main rd is just right down the rd we are super close" turn after turn,mile after mile, slide from 1 shoulder to the other again and again we are told "almost there". Run into problem yota again that has been dead for last hlf hr on side of the rd wondering where we were. Swap batteries between yotas while good one still running and send bad one out again, btw he has been running with no headlights since the fallen tree. Finally we hit the main highway and rubicon owner recognizes where we are from snowmobiling and knows we are 15 miles out from closest town and another 5 miles from town closest to the tow rigs which are 5 miles outside of that one. Down the highway in the freezing rain all on single digit pressures and im on low fuel light figuring this thing has gotta die anytime now. I have never driven that fuel conserving in my life(neutral down any sort of hill, accelerating slower than a old hippie van pulling a 40ft winnebago motorhome behind it etc). Finally make it into the first town coasting into the gas station just running out of fuel like a block away in my blazer at like 11pm. We all fill up and try to use their air compressor which couldnt even fill up a bicycle tire in less than 5 minutes and say screw it and continue on after the first rig. Back on highway to closest town to tow rigs and local boy that "knew the area and was taking us on 4hr short run" pulls over and says "i gotta get home your gonna have to find your own way back to your other rigs". There was words exchanged at this point and he made the smart decision to continue on and get us back to our tow rigs for his sake. Finally 1am blazer is loaded onto trailer as with the other rigs and we head for home which is another hr and a hlf away. Needless to say all i got was a short nap in my soaked clothes before i had to leave for work at 4:30 that same morning.

Picture is from first winch fest not even a mile from the truck. Pictures were not the slightest concern or thought shortly after this when the problems started.

Steve [Entry 54]

A True Glamis Story:

Dick and my girlfriend work together. Ron, Sally [owners of Suzuki quads] also from her work are invited to join us at Glamis for the long weekend. We make the trek out to Wash 15, it's a busy weekend, the 'Washes' will be a nice place to camp.

Dick dunes over to our camp on Friday morning, he's a quiet fellow, driving an 'Old School' JSC Invader Rail. He's camped over at 'Pad 2.5' off Gecko Road. He walks over to my trailer, and under awning, my GF, Sally, and Dick start talking shop. Ron's helping me ready the rails and quads for our first ride.

Hey, we are all adults, we are all here to have fun, except, I don't drink, so I look with wondering eyes as my GF grabs a bottle of Tequila and offers Dick and Sally a shot, and then another. It's 1 pm, I think: "Whatever, I want to dune..." -------------------------------

Finally ready to roll, all gassed up we take off from camp... About a minute into a slow cruise out of the Wash, I notice one of my GF's mini rail paddles throwing more sand than the other one. A sign of too low of air pressure. So, we stop on a little sand burm, Ron stops to my left, I start to explain the issue.

NOW... If we all Had a Set of Rugged Radios... this bad day would not have happened... for we would have just told everyone our intentions...

Dick, doesn't stop in time. Damn, hits Ron from behind, bends an axle and destroys a rim and paddle [on his quad] Ron is thrown over handle bars, some how, lands on his feet after a front flip, I saw it happen and I still don't believe it... Sally and my GF start laughing like fools. No one is hurt... Ron and I cast a weary eye at Dick. "Sorry man, my brakes didn't stop ..." I leave the laughing fools with Dick to sort it out, Ron and I go back to camp to get his other quad...

Ten, twenty minutes go by. 50 minutes later GF tows Dick into camp, and she starts yelling: "No brakes, I cant's stop" as she rolls to a stop laughing. Not funny GF. Not Funny Dick. Dick has attached a tow rope around my GF's rail axle, for her to tow him back to our camp, his rail wont start after the accident. The tow rope, snaps off the brake line in the caliper. I walk over to unhook the tow rope, and mumble: "Twenty minutes in camp and two OHV's disabled, by a Dick..."

NOW... If we Had a base camp and Set of Rugged Radios... Dick could have warned us he was on his way over and we could have hid from Dick...

Ron and I try to fix the carnage... Dick is over 'adjusting' his Webers, gas is pouring out on the sand, I nudge Ron, and we just watch Dick, we both think soon we might need to put him "out". Dick somehow gets his rail started, and drives away.

Ron and I get our OHV's going, and the rest of the weekend goes pretty well.

Moral of the Story- Get a set of Rugged Radio's and Don't Dune Like Dick...

---------------------------------End Of Story? No there's more---------------------------------

Part 2- Monday Morning... I call GF at her work, and see how Ron feels after his handle bar acrobatics three days earlier. I also ask her about Dick. "I can't talk right now, I'll tell you when I get home, terrible weird stuff..." What on earth could be more terrible and weird with Dick? I'll find out...

So after Dick leaves our camp he some how makes it back to his Camp through dunes, to Pad 2.5 He then while waiting for his group to arrive Friday night, Dick decides to go for a cruise north up towards The Glamis 'Drags'. However, during the ride [by himself-bad idea] he gets turned around in the dunes...

If He Only Had a Set of Rugged Radios...

Dick's glasses do not fit under his goggles, so he has left them in his camp. He's driving around, and runs out of fuel. The sun has now set, and he starts walking. As he walks up a small 8 foot burm hill, He sees what he believes are the lights of Roadrunner Camp in the distance. He takes a triumphant step towards his camp, and tumbles down the cement siding of the Coachella Canal. It wasn't Gecko Road he sees in the distance, it's Holtville's lights.

Freezing wet, and now 100% worried he is going to drown, Dick starts treading water, not knowing there is a ladder in the canal every quarter mile. The 3-4 MPH current has Dick floating, swimming, and grabbing the sides of canal. He's been taken 'down' stream a mile before he sees a ladder. Finally he's out, and this time sees Gecko Roads Roadrunner Camp. Some how he ended up miles south turned around. It happens...

His group gets to his camp.before he does, they see a wet, sad Dick walk up... They go out looking for his rail. No luck, they will look again in morning. Their morning dune ride, out looking for his rail, again they still couldn't find it.

Dick then drives over to the Holtville airport. Maybe if he flies over dunes they will be able to find his rail. They do, half way between Roadrunner, and Patton Valley. Dick wonders, how did I get there?

Through out it all, Dick was Dick, and not smart. Dick left his common sense at home that weekend. He regained it though, for I later heard, Dick never went back to Glamis, he gave away all his sand toys, and he quit drinking...

Good for Dick... You know the 'moral' of the story...

--------------------------------

Get a Set of Rugged Radio's and... Don't Dune Like Dick!

Zach [Entry 55]

We where on our spring break run that my friends and I do every year, this year was our 10th year and my girlfriend was comeing up after she got off work. We arieved about 830 in the morning. We set up came and set out to go play. We decided to go do a creek run which we have done time and time again. But at the end of the creek there is a very tight and narrow section and none over us have got past ten feet. So we tried my friend clayton tried first and feel in on the drivers door we winches him back and out then it was my turn. I started down the tight section of creek in my 68 wagoneer named sally. To do it I knew that I neede to straddle the creek with only a few inchs of tire holding sally upol on each side. Now being in a wagoneer I could not see the passenger side the best. About a quarter of the way through I fell in on the drivers side. I was like dam because i ran out of fuel for the angle i was at. And atlest nothing was hurt at least not yet. As my friends came down to see what had happened they decided to sot on top of my jeep that is the funny part as I was putting fuel in. Now as I tried to back out every thing was going great my friends were off the top and I was even getting out with out a winch. My friend tim was sopting me and it took a few times back and forth to get sally up and back on all 4 tires. At this time a radio would have been great. Tim gave me a thumbs up and I thought I was in the clear so I backed up a few more feet on the drivers bank and flip over on the passenger windshield frame. I pushed the cab back towards the drivers tale light. The worst part my girlfriend now my wife was not there yet and never got to go play and she reminded me that we were going on the rubbicon in two weeks. My weekend was done at 1030 atlest no one got hurt just my pride. And we did get it fixed for the rubbicon thanks to some great friends. Thanks claton and tim. The pics r of sally when we got home and of us on soupbowl

Chris [Entry 56]

I learned the value of reliable communications offroad last summer. My wife, 2 year old daughter and I went to the Owyhee mountains in southwestern Idaho for a day of offroad fun. My 99 Jeep Cherokee is well built and reliable, with good suspension, tires, and recovery gear, along with a CB radio. We never worried much about being stranded, knowing that my Jeep is capable and well-equipped. On this day, we decided to tackle a fairly difficult trail called Sinker Creek. The trail travels through a narrow canyon, through which a small creek runs. The trail travels through dense trees, large rocks, and dozens of water crossings as the trail zig-zags back and forth across the creek. After travelling the length of the trail, we faced the decision of taking the easy exit trail back to civilization, or continuing through the creek to a small reservoir. Needless to say. We decided to go the hard way. After struggling to get traction in a wide, muddy section of the creek, we decided to try a narrow strip of shore alongside the creek. As we ventured down this narrow bank, we came across what appeared to be a nice, dry trail leading towards the reservoir. It turned out to be not so dry. There was a dry crust on top of thick, sticky mud. By the time I realized I was in trouble, it was already too late. The left side of the Jeep sank deep into the mud, causing the Jeep to tip onto its left side, leaning against the steep canyon wall. Even with front and rear lockers, I had no hope of driving out. All 4 tires just spun in the gooey mud, which made the Jeep sink even deeper into the mud, and lean even harder unto the canyon wall. Knowing I was done. I got out and assessed my situation, and got out my recovery gear. I tried winching a number different ways, but could not free the Jeep. My 2 year old daughter started to get upset over our predicament, so I reached for my CB radio and called out for help. No luck. No response on any channel. My truck stop CB just didn't have the power to reach anybody. We were about 6 miles of harsh terrain from the nearest dirt road, and more than 25 miles from pavement, cell phone signal, or any frequently traveled area. I knew that hiking out would be a long, difficult prospect. I had plenty of food, water, and other gear in the Jeep that would keep us alive, but I knew my 2 year old wouldn't be happy about an impromptu night of camping in a Jeep laying on its side. My wife took the CB and continued calling for help, while I began shoveling to try to free the Jeep. Fortunately, after about 90 minutes of digging, I was able to use the winch to get the jeep pulled upright enough that I could get rocks under the tires, change my winch rigging, and finally the Jeep was able to claw its way out. Granted, wheeling alone in such a remote, and harsh area wasn't a smart decision on my part, but if I'd had a better off-road communication system, I might have been able to reach someone who could help.

Tim [Entry 57]

Not a good story writer But attached a few of my stuck pictures. We ride hard and mess up on occasion. Picture 1 is a double stuck self winch recovery was the game of the day. BTW was another group stuck at the bottom just outside of the picture. Picture 2 was a easy off camber trail that was not so easy when wet. You can see my RuffStuff 4 link suspension in the rear on this one. The video is was happens when you take the wrong line down a hill.

Phil [Entry 58]

Well I was on vacation on the Oregon Dunes during Dune Fest 2015. It was our last day Saturday and we went out for a night ride. I was the last one in our line of vehicles. I was zig zagging back and forth across the dunes. When I took a too sharpe of a turn at about 35-40 MPH and rolled my RZR. I rolled at least 1 1/2 time and landed on my side with my left elbow pinned under the door edge. I was strapped in with my 4 point harness and was able to release my harness. I had to wait about five minutes or more before the my group noticed that I was not there. I shure could have used a rugged radio to call for help to roll my RZR back on all fours. I bent the roll cage and both rear axles, broke the plastic on all four fenders as well as the bed, plus I bruised my left elbow. At least I did this on the last day of my vacation rather than the first !

Lucas [Entry 59]

A few years back a few friends an I went for an afternoon wheeling trip into the San Bernardino mountain's in southern california .We were on our way down an access road down the backside of the mountain which has a lot of exposure on one side and a few obstacles on the road it's self. As we proceeded down the road we came around a blind turn to find a young boy maybe 8 standing on the side of the road, with nobody else around, of course we all stop and jump out and as we approach the young boy we notice an older man clawing his way up the very steep hillside covered in oil and dust . Apparently they were bringing up the rear of their group and had an issue with the vehicles steering, and drove righ off the road, by only luck the truck was caught by a lonley tree on the slope about 50 ft down the hill. we realized then we had passed their group about 15mins prior to us finding the boy and his dad, we asked the channel they were using and my friend had to jet back to the top of the hill in hopes of being able to reach them via CB, lucky he was able to make contact and we reunited the group. We could have much more safely contacted the group or medical help if needed if we had a more powerful radio system.

Marc [Entry 60]

I was leading a group of 17 Jeeps on the Holcomb Creek trail on Jan. 8, 2017. I was approaching the rock pile in the middle of the trail when a dead pine tree fell and hit my driver's side door and into my B-pillar between it and my seat belt hitting my head rest. The tree missed my neck by merely inches. I was only going about 5-10 mph but by the time I stopped my Jeep the momentum had swung the tree forward hitting me and my girlfriend in the back of the head. We both sustained significant head wounds and began to bleed. My 11 year old daughter was in the back seat and was untouched by the tree but she became upset seeing her dad and his girlfriend bleeding from their heads. I had gone ahead of the group to set up lunch for the other drivers so I was about 3/4 of a mile ahead of the group. If I had a Rugged radio I would have been able to radio the rest of the group to get help much earlier than we did. Luckily we did not lose consciousness before the rest of the group got their. There is no cell service in this area so we were unable to communicate with the rest of the group at that point. We were very lucky that day that our injuries were not more serious. Rugged Radios would have certainly came in handy that day.

Greg [Entry 61]

My family and I race a 200mph front engine dragster. It is imperative we have constant communications to ensure we are at 100%. Thanks to Rugged Radios, that has NEVER been a problem. I've been buying our equipment from you guys for as long as i remember. I've always had service above and beyond, and great shipping. Thanks for everything you guys do!

Tro [Entry 62]

2015 Norra Mexican 1000. Day 3. 3/4 of the way into the stage on my way to La Paz along the beach. Single seat buggy. Silt beds. Stuck but get pulled out by fellow racer. Then motor dies. 1 hour until dark. 1:15 until stage time out. Dehydrated, sweating, drivers suit soaked...very weak. In and out of the car trying to fix it to get moving. About to pass out. I call it a day and wait for rescue/sweep. I use my Sat phone to call my chase crew and let them know I'm ok but waiting for sweep. Sitting in the car listening to my race radio that won't broadcast but I hear the rescue/sweep say that "they are in the area and are overwhelmed with stuck cars. If we're waiting for them it's going to be a long time, get comfortable." Without a properly tuned Rugged Radio I can't answer back but to hell if I'm staying out here any longer than I need too. I make one last ditch effort and jimmy-rig a longer coil wire and bang-o, engine fires up! Woohoo! I drive like a scared ape to finish the stage, 15 minutes before timing out. We went on to finish the rally and win our class!

Todd [Entry 63]

I never thought our club would have to make that call over the radio. We did on the weekend of the 13th of November. It is a scary thought that we would have to make that call, as we are pretty seasoned wheelers out on the trail. In this article, I will discuss what was done right, and what was done wrong during the trail ride and medical evacuation.

The day started with what was supposed to be an easy trail ride in the Panamint Valley range for the Cal4Wheel event called Panamint Valley Days. The club went off on their own on Friday, even though there were organized runs, but headed up a trail called Pleasant Canyon and down South Park. About half way through South Park you come to a sharp turn to the left with a drop off on the right. There is a rock also on the left that kind of tips the jeeps off to the right as you make the turn. Normally plenty of room to make the turn and the organized event has a spotter here. They have had large 4x4’s to include a H1 Hummer make the turn, so it is not that bad, but caution is needed. Our club member is afraid of heights and hugged the rock, and caused her jeep to climb the cliff side rock more than normal. She allowed her jeep to climb to high and it rolled over and then down the cliff, just over 100 feet to the bottom. The jeep rolled about three times, maybe four and stopped on its passenger side facing the other way that she was driving. Almost immediately, the call went out across the CB’s that she had rolled down the cliff. Fellow club members immediately headed down the cliff to assist her and the two kids in the vehicle. She climbed out under her own power and the kids got out also. One of our club members is a former EMT and has a medical bag. The driver had a large cut on her head from the roof collapsing almost to the dash board during the roll and slide down the hill. The trail leader hearing the call about the roll over immediately stopped his jeep to assist. Once he was out of his jeep, he realized that he forgot to shut it off and reached in through the open window to shut it off. Not sure if he hit the gear shift, or forgot to place it in park, but his jeep started rolling down the trail with the mountain side on his side and a cliff on the passenger side also. He could not get into his jeep so he steered it into the cliff side to stop it, were it proceeded to roll onto its side. If you are counting, we now have two vehicles on their sides and the quickest way off the mountain is past a rolled over jeep blocking the trail. The passenger here was quickly evaluated and had no injuries. The jeep was put back on its wheels and quickly sent off for help, as CB calls were not answered. The second jeep was assisted back onto its wheels and headed down the hill to get help for the injured driver in the canyon. They pretty much had to finish running the trail before they reached anyone on the CB radio. Base camp now had the word that we had a jeep rolled over into a canyon and needed medical help. The calls from base camp started going out on ham radios and people were sent into the two nearest towns for calls of assistance. The fire department rescue at the one town said it was out of their area and could not respond, but did make calls to assist. At the other town, there was a Search and Rescue team and they responded to the bottom of the mountain, but would not go up the mountain to help. CHP arrived and hitched a ride to the accident scene and assisted with the medical needs and transport up out of the canyon. BLM showed up with a 4 door JK and would not lend a hand. Ultimately, the injured driver was placed in the back of the JK and transported down the hill to the life flight helicopter.

Lessons learned so far.

1. CB radios are not good for long range communications. Our club is now working at a feverish pace to get our FCC license to use the ham radios.

2. The basic first aid kits we all carry and are required on all organized runs did not have the right size bandages needed to cover the head wound. We have since bought a trauma bag and will stock an ammo can with larger bandages, gauze and tape for such an issue in the future. We all had a false sense of security with the little first aid kits we carry and if this victim had had more cuts, we would have been out of bandages. Now, in a pinch, you can use a clean shirt to wrap a wound, but how clean is your shirt after being on the trail all day?

3. Do not count on Search and Rescue coming to help you. We did as those at the scene were told help is coming. It did, but stopped at the bottom of the mountain and would not climb the mountain to assist.

4. How many people are trained in basic first aid to assist in an accident like this in your club? Luckily, we have one who is, and the rest of us will get some training for future accidents on the trail or our general travels.

5. If you are part of a club or organization that organizes an event of this type, do you have an emergency plan in case something like this happens? This will include who to call, who will handle communications with the emergency responders, and who will respond to the scene to be the on-scene leader? I do not know if the club handling this event did or not, but it will be on our list when our club hosts an event. We will also test it out prior to the event using all forms of communication that we will have available, to include a sat phone, SPOT, ham radios and CB’s. Most of the time, cell phones have no reception in the areas that we recreate in.

6. Carry an emergency blanket or two for everyone that will be in the vehicle. Coats and other warm items need to be with those that may have to spend a night on the trail. The Off-Highway community is tight nit and pulled together to assist as needed during this emergency and the next day to recover the vehicle. The BLM that night were only concerned about getting the vehicle out, as that was their first question asked of those that helped get the injured driver off the hill. She was not even on the life flight yet when this question was asked of the BLM official.

So, in wrap up, take a look at your first aid kits, how you will communicate in just such an emergency and are you able to assist.

There are many pictures of the wrecked jeep on the internet. Search Google.com for Panamint Valley Days, Chicken Rock.

Are you ready to make that Mayday calls if needed, and do you have the tools to assist if you come across such a scene on one of your trails. Our club will be from now on. Here are some pictures of the jeep after we recovered it from the canyon. I did not talk about the recovery of the jeep, as we had a good crew to get the jeep out of the canyon, and talked about what we wanted to do before we did it, and looked at everything from a safety stand point.

Ty [Entry 64]

I manage a tow company in Tucson, Az. and we volunteer to help clean up off-road trails with the ATV and four wheel drive clubs every year. Last year there was three vehicles that they needed help with that had been stripped and burned or stolen and driven over a cliff. The one that had been driven over the cliff would have been nice to have had two way communication between myself and my riggers 580 feet below. I was very hoarse after shouting all day and can appreciate the use of two way communication.

Chris [Entry 65]

The time we were racing came in to get tires and fuel .Well got the tires and since they were put on I figured fuel was added also well I was wrong .Got the green to go and my race car fell flat on its face so I went from the leader to dead last post the champion chip also that night .So I have learned having radios is a good thing.

Saroeung [Entry 66]

Kinda of a "Dumb-@$$ of the day moment" for my wife and I...but for the sake of the contest and to prevent anyone from doing what we did...here it goes. Let me start by saying we were new to off roading. We bought our Yamaha Rhino 660 Sport in 2007. We got it equipped with a roll cage and bucket seats with 3-point harnesses for driver and passenger side and 5 point harness for the kids seat in the rear. We often go out to the Lake Havasu as my in laws have a home out there. We were excited to take out the Rhino in Havasu as it was registered there and we were able to drive on public roads. Before our trip I go out and purchase a book "Guide to Arizona Backroads & 4-Wheel Drive Trails". Excited about the book and the awesome trails, we plan our first trip out to Havasu and to explore the Great Outdoors! We arrive in Havasu and the following day my wife and I decide to go exploring. We pack up some drinks, get our kids (5-yeak old son and 2-year old daughter) into their seats and off we go. Page 117 Mohave Wash trail is what we decide to do. After following the book for what seemed like forever, we get to a point where we reach a sign that says "Do Not Enter - closed to public". Obviously we were shocked to see it as our trusty book did not mention anything about it. We then proceed to backtrack using instructions provided in reverse order to head home. Needless to say everything looks different heading in opposite direction and we were LOST. Not a person in sight. I was nervous and scared and was praying we figure our way out. Nearly an hour or so goes by and still no sign of anyone out off roading. We keep at it and our prayers were finally answered, we bumped into a group off roading in their side by sides and tell them we're lost and if we can follow them back to their camp which was off the main highway 95. We follow them with urgency! I mean, I did not let them out of my sight. We make it to the highway and THANKED the group! They were life savers that day!!! I think we would still be there if we didn't run into them. Oh by the way, we would've called someone as a last resort however there was no cell service and even if there was we wouldn't know how to describe our location to them as we did not have a GPS device. That was the scariest moment of my life. My wife and I learned a few lessons that day. 1) Go off roading in groups 2) don't follow directions from a book (landscape changes so it's unreliable 3)buy a GPS and use it 4) Get a radio to communicate with other people in case of emergency.

Dallas [Entry 67]

I was with a group of guys at Glamis dunning when I was at the end of the line when I had a trailing arm break when I crested a hill. I rolled 6 times down into the bowl of the dune. i was down there for about 30-45 minutes before they came back and found us. If I had had a rugged radio setup I could have gotten help to us quicker. I ended up with a broken collar bone and 4 broken teeth. Camp RZR came out to help with my RZR, which had a broken a-arm, trailing arm, brake caliper, broken whip and the whole rear plastics

Matt [Entry 68]

I'm a student pilot. I'll start with that. I've spent the last year and change dumping every last penny I make into fueling aircraft and working towards my ratings. Part of the penny pinching included, admittedly, a less than top quality headset with which to communicate to the world outside pf my little aluminum rocket. So here I am, probably less than 15 hours of instruction in, hurtling through time and space a couple thousand feet above the ground outside of Lexington, KY - a relatively busy airport on this sunny afternoon - with (thankfully) my instructor. Lexington approach is doing a fine job of keeping us all aware of our own little piece of airspace and my instructor and I are chatting along about, ironically, communications with the tower when he is suddenly, mid sentence, cut off. Now, trainer airplanes are kind of loud. So when the headset goes out, everything else kind of drowns out in the drone of horizontally opposed 4 cylinder sitting up front. The only noise louder than that engine at that moment was the sound of my butthole slapping shut as it hit me that I could no longer communicate verbally with, well, anyone. I looked over and could see my instructor, blissfully unaware that his "pilot-in-command-in-training" just lost his comms. Hell, I didn't even know whether he was still able to talk to the outside world. Luckily, after some improvised hand gestures, no shortage of confusion, and a couple radio calls, we established that I was the only one in the plane without communication.

Luckily the only damage for the day was a couple extra grey hairs, one inop headset, and an impromptu lesson on no-comm flight. Still, would have been nice to have had a good Rugged Radio instead.

No pics from that flight, so here's the Lexington city lights at night.

Jim [Entry 69]

loaned my sand rail to some models for Playgirl magazine and the idiots drove it into the all American canal at the north end of glamis dunes before the canal was moved tied a rope to it pulled it out and drove it back to camp didn't get a drop of water on the engine because the grooved drag slicks floated the car we had to swim after it and pull it in to shore...

Chad [Entry 70]

This is my story of how a Rugged Radio would have helped twice in one night

I was in WV with some friends and we were going for a night ride at about 11 pm. We were roughly 10 miles from camp (and anything else) and shooting through the woods at fairly quick speeds of around 30 mph. In one of the trails that we were going down there was a large rock protruding from the trail that was about 2ftx1ft and sticking out of the ground about a 1 ft. I saw it in JUST enough time to dodge it but the Can Am Maverick that was following me was not so lucky. The impact was hard enough to collapse his right front suspension. It ripped off his lower control arm, bent his shock, blew a hole in the wheel and tire and jammed that into the rotor and caliper and then took that entire mess of suspension parts and crammed it into and partially through his passenger floor board. We did not instantly know he had hit that so we drove on ahead for a mile or so and then sat waiting on him for 10 min or so. That is instance one of that night that a Rugged Radio would have made a huge difference.

After collecting the crumpled Maverick and dragging it to an opening of the trail, the Maverick owner jumped in my SxS and I gave him a ride back to the camp site so he could get his truck and trailer to recover what was left of his rig while the last of our group stayed with the Maverick to keep an eye on it. When we were within a mile or 2 of the camp site my wet clutch let go and came apart inside the motor. This stopped us instantly in our tracks. This is the second instance where having a Rugged Radio would have helped us, because now our group still out in the woods had no idea we were also having troubles.

In the end we walked back to camp and got the truck and trailer and recovered both SxS's but it was about 3 am before we got everything done and back to camp. If we had had the Rugged Radios I'm sure that we could have shortened that time or possibly never had the first accident happen at all because we could have called out the rock in the trail over the radios. This is where you live and learn I guess. The picture shows my machine torn apart to find the wet clutch problem. The video shows the rock that took out the Maverick.

Wayne [Entry 71]

I am sorry mine is not Ruff it is how we could have used more radios. We were on a State Guard mission and we had problems with our radios as they would not reach the most out laying mountainous area. even when relaying messages it was not good. we ended up using runners with hand written notes.

If we had a base and mobile unit with a larger antenna it may have helped.

The State Guard in VT are total volunteers and we have to purchase everything from uniforms to all of our personal equipment including 2 way radios. which is very expensive/ Sorry no photos were allowed on the mission

Eric [Entry 72]

I my wife and another couple were on a high mountain train in southern Utah. I was talking with the other couple when my wife thought she might head out ahead of us. some how she got off on a different trail than she was supposed to be on. we shouldn't have been but a couple of minutes behind her. but after getting down the trail for over 30 minutes there was no sign of her. We started to worry. We backtracked to find where she might have turned off. We split up on a a couple of trail there were so many other tracks that it was hard to distinguish which might be hers. After nearly 2 hrs. To my relief I met her coming back towards me on the trail I had chosen. I'm sure we wouldn't have been so worried and wasted a lot of good riding time if we would have had radios to communicate.

So I think we could really use a way to stay in touch.

Bill [Entry 73]

Although the story would be better with photos and videos, this happened right after I picked up my stock '94 YJ in the fall of 1996, and well before everyone had cell phones to take selfies and videos.

Not knowing much about driving my Jeep just yet, I took it out on a great trail just west of Boulder, CO. The trail crossed a little creek and since I had a couple friends with me, I decided to charge through, not knowing how deep the water was. Jeeps make better tanks than submarines. A wave of water over the hood, a quick gulp of water into the intake and I was hydrolocked. Dead in the middle of the stream.

Despite the best efforts of my three friends, and with the water quickly washing away the sand and gravel around the tires, we were not going anywhere. Then, around the corner came a sweet grey CJ to the rescue. I can still see it to this day. The helpful dude had all the right tools; a strap to pull me out of the stream and a ratchet and spark plug socket to fix the pesky H2O problem. One quick crank of the engine, a jet of water out of the plug holes and the intrepid straight six fired up and I was on my way.

Lessons learned:

1) Know what your vehicle can handle.

2) Carry some basic tools.

3) Hoping someone will come along to your rescue is not a great plan.

4) A rugged radio would have been a great insurance plan!

Although I still have the YJ, and many upgrades have come along the way, including full width axles, a Chevy 5.3 and 35's, a radio would be an excellent addition to my rig.

Devin [Entry 74]

Well I went up local mountain 1 night and some of my buddies were already up there wheeling and I thought I knew where they were but I guess not and I got stuck with know one around me and no cell service all my other friends have radios !! So I started walking about 1hour later they started coming down and I was at the bottom waiting lesson learned

Dave [Entry 75]

Here's my son Cody ( who has cerebral palsy ) learning to drive his new tank chair using our RH - 5 rugged radios and headsets.

Tyler [Entry 76]

This October our family made its first trip up to Mammoth mountain (June Lake) . Must say that the trails up there are outstanding to say the least! So I decided to take our RZR 1000 out for a quick "Solo spin" never a good idea ! Not 10 mins into the ride I noticed a cool little track like trail that had a cool up hill berm that I couldn't resist! So I pinned it! Well all was good until I hit the "cool berm" ! This is where I Ran Out of Talent .... Little did I know the the berm was actually super soft sand over what seemed to be gravel . My passenger side front wheel dug in, and before I knew it my beloved RZR was on its side ! I do have a regular radio set up in my car, but that did me no good at this point because I was by myself and my wife and kids we're back at camp with no handheld or base camp communication set up. I was stranded with a good distance of walking ahead of me! Luckily I was not injured and the cage and harnesses did thier job! Moral of the story it's not a good idea to go on a solo mission especially if you don't have a base camp radio set up !

Jeff [Entry 77]

My story starts on just an average day. I was driving home in my 86 Toyota 4x4. I live in a rural area outside of Austin. it's an hour drive there and an hour back, so I was already at the point of road hypnosis and was on autopilot. I turned onto a small two lane road and soon came upon several cars that were just stopped on the road. I also noticed that the cars coming from the other direction were stopped also. well, I work as a paramedic and my first thought was that there was a car wreck up ahead. so, of course I pulled around the cars to pull up to the front to see if there was anything I could do to help. when I got to the front I didn't see any crashed cars or any reason that all the cars were stopped. I was puzzled and began to look around....out of the corner of my eye I spot what looks like an animal off in the ditch. It was a dark mass and my mind seemed to tell me it was a dog....as I sat there and stared, I saw this animal rise up and stand on two feet. My mind still wouldn't allow me come to terms with what I was seeing..then the animal looked straight at me and raised its arms up and screamed like a banshee... well, my mind finally came to terms with me staring straight at a huge, fully pissed off, monster looking chimp. It suddenly began running straight at my truck. it was at this time I realized I had my window down....I had manual windows in that old truck and almost broke my arm rolling that window up. The pissed of monkey, that looked like he wanted to kill me and then take over the world, jumped on the side of my truck. I had sliders and a roof bar that the mad monkey grabbed ahold off. It then began beating on the side of the truck and roof. Now the monkey looked mean....he was screaming...had his mouth open and showing massive teeth. I thought this was the end and he was going to smash my window and eat my face off...I looked around in the cab for any kind of weapon, but found none. If I had a gun I would have unloaded through the window. In that kind of situation..you make quick decisions.. the only one I came up with was I was going to get that monkey off my truck anyway necessary.. so, I hit the gas..my plan was to peel that chimp off the side of my truck on the nearest car, tree, whatever it took. as I accelerated.. I think the monkey knew I was serious..he jumped off as I headed to the oncoming cars...beating the side of my truck as I went....so, I was free...I didn't let up on the gas till I was a long ways down the road... If I had a rugged radio I could have called for help....or at least told this story to my wheeling buddie while on the trail. I later found out that the chimp has excaped from its cage on a ranch...it attacked it's handler and broke his arm..went across the highway and attacked a woman in her house....then I was the lucky one to run across it. after this happened I called my wife to try and relate this story and her only response was...."have you been drinking". I guess that was fair. Not many chimps out on the roads in Texas.....

Glenn [Entry 78]

My wife and I along with our 15yr old son went night riding at River Ranch in Lake Wales, my wife and I were in our SXS Yamaha Viking 6 seater and my son was on his 4 wheeler. We were several miles away from our camp which the rest of our family was and our SXS shut down as a result of a bad sensor but none of us had a cellular signal and my sons atv couldn't tow the SXS. We sat there for 5 hours before finally seeing someone who helped us out. I never thought I would have a need for anything other than a cellphone, but had I had a 2-way radio system I could have reached our base camp to get help several hours earlier.

Mike [Entry 79]

That one time we rode with Brantley Gilbert. It was a day full of mud & fun. The man is a nut, the tragedy was, we could only talk to him during breaks in riding!! A little bit of communication, and play by play, would've made an unbelievable day even better!!!

Tim [Entry 80]

About a year and a half ago I went out and bought a brand new can am maverick. I'm a young hard working guy that had been saving for quite a few years to buy a sxs of my own. It was the first brand new vehicle I had ever purchased and it's worth as much as the truck and little toy hauler that I pull it with combined. About 3 weeks after I brought the Maverick home, I took it out for its first trip. After a full day of playing we had decided to start to head back to camp. About 7 miles away from camp, we came around a blind corner and collided with a rzr head on. When the dust settled, everyone was ok but it destroyed all the drivers side suspension, bumper and plastics. Nobody's fault, just a poorly timed accident. The rzr involved was not even drivable. We were on a road what a truck could have easily come up to get us. With no cell service, no other way to call for help and minimal tools, we put as much back together as we could. Then we wished our unlucky friends in the rzr good luck and limped it back. If we could have been picked up instead of having to drive back it would have saved the cv's and bearings on the front end. After the accident, it sat for 6 months until I could put the money together to piece it back together. It's now 100% but still missing a radio. With a rugged radio we would have been able to call back to camp for help and possibly even helped the rzr in the collision find it's way out. Below are pictures and a video of the day of the accident and during the rebuild.

Dean [Entry 81]

Snap rolled my outboard tunnel boat in turn one of the race. Tried to swim out while upside down under water. Got trapped in shattered wind shield and could not surface. I was unable to swim back into cockpit to get to my air system . My helmet was found floating behind the boat 100 feet with a still fully secured chinstrap in place. Made it out with last breath. My rugged radios I use for communication had to be dried out and continued working.

Dan [Entry 82]

My wife and I were out with friends doing a night ride at the dunes. We were on our quads and our friends were in their side by sides. It was exceptionally dark with no moon or stars in the sky but we all have LED lights so we weren't too worried about not being able to see. That all changed when the two of us got separated from the group.

The dunes at night are a whole lot different than the daytime. It's easy to get disoriented and sometimes even hard to tell up from down. My wife slowed down a bit to crest a dune and ended up getting stuck for a few seconds at the top. By the time she got her quad free and pointed down hill the rest of the group was out of site. Neither of us had radios, but the rest of the group had Rugged Radios installed. If we had radios it wouldn't have been a problem... but we didn't.

We spent the next hour running real slow and looking for a landmark to point us back to camp with no luck. We sure wished we had taken the time to grab one of the handheld radios that our friends had, but we didn't think we would need it... we did.

After an hour we final made happened across a Forestry Service boundary marker. We now knew where we were and it was a long way from where we needed to be. We started putting back towards what we though was the direction to camp and just when we thought we were getting close to camp, we popped over a dune only to see nothing but black. We were not where we thought we should be and starting to get nervous.

Another ten minutes passed and we saw the blue LEDs of our buddy's flag. Fortunately he saw us and came to get us. He had been looking for the entire time and another group had gone back to camp to see if we had made it back there. Thanks to their radios, they were able to let everyone know we had been found but if we had radios, we never would have got lost!

The moral of the story is never go desert riding at night without a good radio setup unless you want to spend the night sleeping in the sand!

Tim [Entry 83]

On our trip to the hammers we wheeled all day and didn’t have any issues so we decided to do a night run up sledge. We left about 8pm and were making good time as my buddy made it up and over the waterfall. Then I made it over in a couple attempts. We were both driving Toyota 4 runners so after passing the waterfall we were at the spot where you run the left side as high as you can up the wall and then come down and your rear diff does not get hung on the rocks as you pass through. At that point I sheared all the hub studs on the driver front and a few on the passenger trying to climb the wall. At that point we decided we could make it up with a strap and make it back in a reasonable amount of time. So we make sure what was left of the hub studs was tight and continued on slowly. We ended up back on the lakebed at about 3 am and everyone was asleep except my buddies wife. She was walking around the lakebed for the last couple hours trying to find someone that would take her out through sledge to check on us. (What a crazy idea to have some random person take you through sledge in the middle of the night.) Luckily she didn’t really try to find someone till about 1am and everyone was back and had gone to bed or was way too wasted to drive and look for us. When we got back to the lakebed my buddy looked in the camper and she was not there but others told us she was wandering the lakebed looking for a ride up sledge. So we drove around the lakebed for a quick trip to find her and bring her home. It would have been great to be running more than a CB so we could have told her everything was going well and we were just traveling slowly with a broken rig. I have since upgraded to ARP studs and so far seem to be holding up well to my 30 spline Longfields that I got from Bobby (RIP) himself.

The photos are of my truck going up sledge waterfall on another trip and replacing a broken 30 spline where the cage in the birf broke and took out the splines on the axle as well.

Brent [Entry 84]

Sunday morning after a nice weekend at Glamis. We went for a ride in our friends' rails. 2 big V8 rails blasting through the dunes. Shannon's rail broke an axle DEEP out on the dunes. We tried to tow him out but it was no use. His rail is too big and heavy. We decided that we needed to go back to camp and get his spare axle. Shannon did not want to leave his rail sitting out in the dunes by itself so he stayed with it. We marked his location on the GPS in Nick's rail and went to get his axle. We did not know it at the time but Nick had broken the antenna on his GPS the day before. We realized that his GPS was not working when we were trying to find Shannon in the dunes. We were driving around looking for him for almost 2 hours, calling him on the radio constantly, when we finally heard his voice come through the headsets. He had turned his radio off when we left and forgot to turn it back on.

We found him via his guidance on the radio. Replaced the axle and were on our way. Only 6 hours later than we wanted to leave that day, but at least we had an adventure!

Joe [Entry 85]

this trail, up a canyon, my dad in a desert rail, my buddy jon and I are attempting, was getting more eroded as we climb, the rut was pretty deep, and getting much worse, narrower and deeper, jon and I are communicating on our new motorcycle helmet headset radios, debating a alternate cutoff back to the hiway, our bikes are plated, the rail not, as we made the climb to the overlook, we knew we would have to negotiate a couple miles of pavement back to 11 mile wash, near verde river, we made the road and with me leading, as we round the turn to the wash, I see a law enforcement ranger checking utv registrations at the wash stageing, I radio'ed jon to turn dad onto the upper trail and boogie to the wash while I devert the rangers attention, he was just getting into his car, I stopped short of cutting him off, and asked if he had any area ohv maps, with a shrug, looking out at what would have been a worthy citation, he answered yeah......after the pause, he said heres what I got, jon then comes on the headset, asking "whats going on"??? ranger hears it with volume cranked, he asked "whos that"?? told him we have a group down wash, heading for the river, and im holding them up, I got the map, and the hell out of there. communication has saved us from many more situations of diversity, and im sure, many more to come. keep those batterys charged, and carry spares, the antenna upgrade, Is a huge difference too.

joes5091 [Entry 86]

Ok But dont fall asleep reading this. The key to this story is Im night blind.Yes I am. So I get the brite idea to go on a Night ride (yes a Night ride) with 14 Arctic Cat Wildcats (a ride up and down mountains too!) So we leave the staging area and within a half hour they leave me in the dust! So I try to feel my way in the dark make a WRONG turn and something tells me to stop so I stop get out walk to the front of the Teryx and there is no trail there! Rain had washed it away! So I decide Im going to make a three point turn on the side of a mountain in the DARK with no Backup lights so its foot brake foot brake get out look foot brake more get turned around get back on a trail(dont know if its the correct trail and lay on my horn) Guess what? The horn finally burns out,Yes! So Im riding around in the dark and again Im night blind! well hours later I find myself back on the correct trail. Got back to my truck and gave it a hug. This would not have happened If I had a Radio like the 14 Arctic Cat Wildcats did. So thats why I could really use a Radio. Thank You. Did you fall asleep?

PB2 [Entry 87]

Shortly after I bought my first sxs, my step-son and I were out in the desert west of town in an area of about 50,000 acres. My step-son has a dirt bike and he was going a little faster than I was comfortable with, being a newbie. Long story short, we got separated. I backtracked, tried to follow his tracks in the sand, and everything else I could think of with no luck. So I headed to the highest ground in the area to see if I could see or hear anything. Still nothing. After an hour or so of looking I had no choice but to head back to the trucks to see if he had returned there. When I arrived at the trucks he wasn't there so I really started to worry. After some waiting it was starting to get dark so I had decided to go back out and look for him. Just as I was gearing up to resume the search he showed up. I was so relieved. A set of radios sure would have saved a lot of time and worry on my part.

Troy [Entry 88]

Five weekends ago myself and my group when out touring here in northern Alberta . There was a old outfitters camp site that we were trying to get too . But last may we had a late snow that brought down thousands of tree's on all the trails . Anyway we had split up looking for a detour around this one bad spot that would take several hours of chainsaw work . The spot that I was checking out was flooded and frozen and after chopping a test hole I decided to cross . I didn't make it . Beaver's were using it as a hi-way and half way out there was a spot wide enough that both of my front tires busted the ice . There I sat with my front suspension at full droop so my rear winch would not pull me out . It was -25 out so by the time my buddy's got there enough water froze around my front diff that as soon as I got free and drove it it tore the seal out of the pinion . If I had a radio I could have gotten my riding buddy's to me faster and not destroyed my diff seal . In frigid temperatures falling into water is a Time sensitive experience . The longer your in the more damage you will have . I got lucky as it was only the front end of my maverick in the freezing water at -25 c . Anyway , good or bad that's my latest story where a radio would have helped . Lol

Mungo [Entry 89]

I was in a group of about 150 fellow off roaders on a yearly trip in my full sized Toyota 4x4 when I decided to scout some trails in my Polaris ACE. About 20 minutes later I rounded a corner and had a major mechanical issue. It was then I realized that I left my radio in my Toyota, and could not radio for help. A 1.5 mile walk over mixed terrain was a hard lesson. Imagine the frustration of having 150 radios listening for a call I could not make because my vehicle did not have a radio, yet there sat a perfectly good radio sitting in my Toyota back at camp. It was then that I decided that sharing one radio in two vehicles was a bad idea.